The Boston Public Market is opening July 30
100 Hanover Street at Haymarket Station
Wednesday - Sunday, 8:00am - 8:00pm

Got It!

"First we eat, then we do everything else." -M.F.K. Fisher

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Kyle Cahill, Director of Sustainability and Environmental Health at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts

Regardless of who you are or where you live, nothing brings people, families and communities together more than food. It's central to life, culture, happiness and health. For New Englanders, agriculture is in our DNA. We are blessed with some of the richest farmland and bountiful seas in the world right here in our tiny slice of the country.

This important connection between people, food and health, and our commitment to healthy living, makes Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts the proud health and wellness partner of the Boston Public Market and its kitchen.

There's a lot to love about the local food the 35+ market vendors and proprietors will be selling. We know it will be delicious. But there's much to love beyond taste. At its core, the Boston Public Market will serve as a critical civic institution that will nurture and support our region's agrarian roots, connect Bostonians and visitors from all walks of life to nourishing and delicious food, and deepen and broaden our community's understanding about how and where our food is grown. The market, its vendors, and its partners appreciate that the best food is nutritious, equitable, affordable, local, sustainable, AND tastes good.

As a health plan focused on the well-being of our 2.8 million members and the community, we know how healthy eating choices can make significant positive changes to our well-being. We also know that too often, making healthy food choices is in conflict with the cost of food. The market's support of food access programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) could have a profound effect for local consumers. While the positive impacts of programs such as SNAP are clear, for those choices to take root and become habit, access to food must be coupled with education. That's why we are a proud sponsor of the market's KITCHEN programming, as it engages consumers in learning about how the food is grown, processed, prepared and cooked.

Recently, Blue Cross moved its headquarters into Boston's Back Bay. Along with the physical move, we established a set of guiding principles that serve as the foundation for all of our food-related programs and offerings, centered on health, quality, sustainability and community. We are excited that the market will introduce new healthy foods and habits to our employees and the Greater Boston community.

Boston Public Market Hosting Bike Rack Design Vote

Public to Vote on Artistic Bike Rack Designs Outside the Upcoming Boston Public Market, Designed by Artists for Humanity

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BOSTON -- The Boston Public Market is hosting a public vote to choose the design of two artistic bike racks that will be installed outside the upcoming local food market, ensuring access to the market for customers arriving by bike. The Market partnered with Artists for Humanity to design nine bike rack options that represent the Market's themes of fresh, local food and the connection between farmer and consumer.

The Boston Public Market will house over 35 farmers, fishermen, and food producers from Massachusetts and throughout New England, selling items such as farm fresh produce; meat and poultry; eggs; milk and cheese; fish and shellfish; bread and baked goods; flowers; and an assortment of specialty and prepared foods. The Boston Public Market, located at 100 Hanover Street above the Haymarket MBTA station, will be open Wednesday -- Sunday, 8 a.m. -- 8 p.m, beginning on July 30.

Members of the public can vote on their favorite bike rack designs here. Voting ends on Wednesday, July 8. The nine bike rack design options, ranging from carrots and tomatoes to giant lobster claws, were designed by Boston teens working with Artists for Humanity, which employs 250+ Boston teens annually in paid apprenticeship in the visual arts and creative industries. Voting results will be showcased on the Boston Public Market's blog.

"Located directly above Haymarket T Station in the heart of downtown Boston, the Boston Public Market is incredibly accessible by transit, bike, and foot," said Boston Public Market CEO Liz Morningstar. "We're excited to welcome customers arriving by bike to the market with bright, creative bike racks designed by Artists for Humanity, and we look forward to receiving the public's input on these designs."

"This project has introduced me to some things about food that I hadn't really thought about," said Artists for Humanity Youth Designer Handy Dorceus, who worked on the bike rack designs. "I never really questioned that strawberries are always available. I never really thought about food being seasonal. Working with Boston Public Market has also showed me that many individual people are responsible for the food that we eat, and I think it's really important for local farmers and food producers to have a place to sell their product."

With support from Boston Bikes and the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, the artistic bike racks will be installed on two corners outside the Market. Traditional bike racks will also be installed on the plaza outside the Market.

"This contest is a terrific idea that will both enhance access for bicycle customers of the Boston Public Market, but will also allow Artists for Humanity, and members of the public who will vote in the contest, to put their own imprint on the design of the new bike racks," said MassDOT Secretary and CEO Stephanie Pollack.

"Boston Bikes is thrilled to have had this opportunity to be involved in preparations for the opening of this exciting new facility," said Boston Transportation Department Commissioner Gina Fiandaca. "It's gratifying to know that customers who choose to cycle to the Boston Public Market will have plenty of conveniently located racks where they can secure their bikes while they shop. We're also pleased that local teens participated in bike rack design for this project and we're looking forward to seeing the winning entries."

The Market is located in downtown Boston's emerging Market District, next to the Haymarket pushcart vendors and the historic Blackstone Block, and it sits on the Rose Kennedy Greenway and the Freedom Trail. 100 Hanover Street also contains the Boston RMV branch, entrances to the Haymarket MBTA station, vent stacks for the Interstate-93 tunnel, and a parking garage. Two Hubway stations are located nearby.

The Boston Public Market is the only locally-sourced market of its kind in the United States. Everything sold at the Market is produced or originates in New England. Boston Public Market vendors are proud to accept SNAP/EBT for all eligible market products.

The Market is a civic resource, educating the public about food sources, nutrition, and preparation. In addition to more than 35 vendor stalls, the Boston Public Market includes a 3,200 square foot demonstration kitchen, programmed by The Trustees of Reservations, the Market's lead programming partner, with opportunities such as hands-on cooking demos, lectures, family activities, exercise classes, training and community events.

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Choose Fresh and Local with your wallet and your license plate

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by Sarah Lambertson, New Entry Sustainable Farming Project

The opening of the Boston Public Market is exciting for consumers and producers alike. It demonstrates our collective investment in supporting local agriculture in Massachusetts and New England. This commitment and support has developed over years of hard work by farmers and producers, dedicated consumers and organizations working to support farmers and connect them to consumers.

There are many ways to support local agriculture, either by shopping at the Boston Public Market, or taking your love of local food on the road by purchasing a new Massachusetts special license plate to benefit farmers, farmers' markets, and the Commonwealth's local food economy.

The new "Choose Fresh & Local" license plate isn't just for show; proceeds will support core programs of New Entry Sustainable Farming Project, Mass Farmers Markets, and the Beginning Farmer Network of Massachusetts, nonprofits that provide training and assistance for beginning farmers, link farmers with farm service providers, and develop new market outlets to connect farmers with consumers.

The license plate initiative could provide a big boost to these programs, and we are very close to getting them on the road. In order for the plates to be printed, 1,500 vehicles must be registered. To be a part of the first rounds of plates and to get your desired number (100-1,600), sign up today and show your support for local agriculture in Massachusetts.

After the first registration, where $28 of the $40 goes to the farmers support organizations (the additional $12 covers the printing of the plates and RMV admin fees), upon the two-year renewal, 100% of the $40 payment goes towards supporting the programs above, and it is all tax-deductible. For more details, visit the license plate's website: www.mafoodplate.org. You can also follow the initiative's progress and spread the word through its Facebook page and the Twitter hashtag: #mafoodplate - a great way to help the cause even if you don't have a car! Let's get this plate on the road to support local food, farmers, and markets!

Sarah Lambertson is the Community Food Projects Coordinator for the New Entry Sustainable Farming Project. She coordinates a national program to support organizations working on community food security issues. She is a native of southeastern Massachusetts and loves eating fresh, local food.

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Boston Public Market Will Open July 30th

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City to Gain Only Locally-Sourced, Permanent Year-Round Market of its Kind in the United States

BOSTON -- The much-anticipated Boston Public Market is set to open its doors on July 30, bringing fresh, local food to the people of Boston five days a week and giving them a new opportunity to taste, buy, and learn about the bounty of New England. The 28,000-square-foot Market will house over 35 farmers, fishermen, and food producers from Massachusetts and throughout New England, selling items such as farm fresh produce; meat and poultry; eggs; milk and cheese; fish and shellfish; bread and baked goods; flowers; and an assortment of specialty and prepared foods.

The Boston Public Market, located at 100 Hanover Street above the Haymarket MBTA station, will be open Wednesday -- Sunday, 8 a.m. -- 8 p.m, beginning on July 30. A list of vendors can be found at their website.

"Next month, our vendors will be selling hundreds of products from over 200 local small businesses here in the Market," said Boston Public Market CEO Liz Morningstar. "We're proud to support over 200 jobs and to have built a home for the local food economy in Boston."

The Market is located in downtown Boston's emerging Market District, next to the Haymarket pushcart vendors and the historic Blackstone Block, and it sits on the Rose Kennedy Greenway and the Freedom Trail. 100 Hanover Street also contains the Boston RMV branch, entrances to the Haymarket MBTA station, vent stacks for the Interstate-93 tunnel, and a parking garage. On-site bike parking is available and two Hubway stations are located nearby.

The Boston Public Market is the only locally-sourced market of its kind in the United States. Everything sold at the Market is produced or originates in New England. Boston Public Market vendors are proud to accept SNAP/EBT for all eligible market products.

The Market is a civic resource, educating the public about food sources, nutrition, and preparation. In addition to more than 35 vendor stalls, the Boston Public Market includes a 3,200 square foot demonstration kitchen.

The KITCHEN, programmed by The Trustees of Reservations, the Market's programming partner, will offer opportunities such as hands-on cooking demos, lectures, family activities, exercise classes, training and community events within the Boston Public Market. Programs are offered by a diverse group of non-profit organizations and for-profit partners, including America's Test Kitchen, Blue Cross Blue Shield, the Boston Children's Museum, Project Bread, the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources, UMASS Amherst, Community Servings, Let's Talk About Food, and Boston Ferments.

"The opening of the Boston Public Market, much like the opening of any new civic organization, will enrich and enhance life in the Commonwealth, said Barbara Erickson, President and CEO of The Trustees of Reservations. "We are pleased to be a part of its success and to accelerate the understanding and appreciation of farming, local food, and locally sourced goods."

100 Hanover Street was built as part of the Big Dig, and the ground floor had been vacant for over 12 years. The architect for the project was Architerra, a Boston-based design firm, and construction was done by Lee Kennedy Company.

"The design of the Market is flexible, durable, and utilitarian, and it's meant to put vendors and their products first, architecture second," said Morningstar. "That's because the Boston Public Market is all about making the connection between food and farm, and allowing the people of Boston to meet the faces behind their food."

The Boston Public Market is a public-private partnership made possible with the support of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the commitment of over $9 million in private philanthropy from many donors. The Market's founding partners include the Henry P. Kendall Foundation, the John W. Henry Family Foundation, Holly and David Bruce, the Manton Foundation, The Trustees of Reservations, and the generous support of an undisclosed benefactor. The Conservation Fund also provided $3 million in financing, and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, the Market's Health and Wellness Partner, is providing funding and content for health and wellness programming.

For more information, visit www.bostonpublicmarket.org, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. You can follow all the activity at the Market by using #bostonpublicmarket.

Boston Public Market Will Keep Massachusetts Agriculture Fresh and Growing

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by John Lebeaux, Commissioner, Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources

The anticipated summer opening of the Boston Public Market will cap many years of planning and hard work from countless individuals and by public and private organizations. Showcasing farmers and food producers from Massachusetts and the region, the market will become a centerpiece of the local food movement, helping to keep Massachusetts agriculture on its current upward trend.

The latest data from the United States Census of Agriculture continues to be positive for the Bay State. Nationally the U.S. witnessed a decline in agriculture from 2007 to 2012; however, Massachusetts was one of the few states that experienced a 1% growth in both number of farms and acres in farmland. Massachusetts' 7,755 farms help to protect over 523,000 acres of open space to produce more than $492 million in agricultural products annually.

Massachusetts' agricultural success is wide spread. The Bay State ranks 5th in the nation for direct market sales at nearly $48 million, and 3rd in the nation for direct market sales per farm. Direct market sales account for 10% of the state's total sales of agricultural products. Massachusetts ranks 6th in the nation for number of farms with Community Supported Agriculture (CSA); a 95% increase since 2007. Over this same time period, the state saw growth in agri-tourism sales of 127%.

The Boston Public Market is important to keep agricultural businesses growing and sustainable by providing a year-round venue for direct sales. The market will be unique, selling only locally grown and produced foods and will strive to make the food accessible to all in the community. Vendors will accept SNAP (food stamps), and WIC and Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program benefits. The Market's demonstration kitchen will bring shoppers together to attend classes with a focus on agriculture in Massachusetts and the region, creative food preparation with local ingredients, nutrition and more! This all bodes well for the future of Massachusetts agriculture.

Grandson of a farmer and son of a nursery owner, John Lebeaux was sworn in as Commissioner of the Department of Agricultral Resources by Governor Charlie Baker on February 6, 2015. After working at Shrewsbury Nurseries, his family's nursery/garden center/landscaping business, while a student, John then worked for four years as an Urban Horticulturist in New York City. After rejoining the family business he served as its General Manager for twenty-six years.

He is a six term Selectman in the Town of Shrewsbury and is a Charter Member of the Shrewsbury Farmers Market Steering Committee. John served nine years as a member of the Massachusetts Board of Food and Agriculture, and served for nine years as a public member of the Massachusetts Water Resources Commission. Prior to appointment as Commissioner, John served slightly less than six years as Town Administrator of the town of Princeton, a rural north central Massachusetts municipality with an active agricultural sector.

The History of Boston's Market District

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Boston's Market District
By Ken Turino

In the beginning, Boston's settlers were served by peddlers using carts selling produce and meat, much like in England. Boston's earliest outdoor market was established around the Town Dock, a center for commerce. In 1734, the town established markets at Dock Square, North Square, and South Market on Boylston Street. Due to contention among residents over an organized and regulated market system, these markets lasted only three years.

With Faneuil Hall in 1742, followed by Quincy Market in 1826, Boston's market district came into it's own. The filling of the Mill Creek saw the expansion of this district when Blackstone Street was laid out by 1833 and Haymarket Square by 1839. This stretch from Blackstone Street to Haymarket Square became what we now know as Haymarket, Boston's open air retail market.

Peddlers using handcarts and later pushcarts continued to roam Boston's neighborhoods well into the Twentieth Century. Starting in 1899, Boston required that "every peddler engaged in selling in the public street will be registered and furnished a number." A Boston Globe article from 1904 estimated there were nearly 800 peddlers, mainly Greeks and Italians.

Haymarket has weathered many challenges, including the building of the Central Artery in the 1950's, which took down one side of Blackstone Street. By the late 1960's, wholesalers who had shops at Quincy Market and Faneuil Hall moved into new distribution centers in Chelsea and the South Bay. The Big Dig, which rerouted the artery underground (completed in 2007) offered its own challenges with proposed development of reclaimed land. Haymarket took on its present boundaries at that time.

In 2015 the market district is poised to have its first major expansion in almost a century with the opening of the Boston Public Market. The market district has and continues to serve residents, students, tourists, and immigrant families.

Over the course of a year, Historic New England, the Haymarket Pushcart Association (HPA), and photographer Justin H. Goodstein photographed and collected oral histories with members of the HPA, vendors, and customers of Boston's Haymarket to document the market. Watch the videos and see the exhibition at Suffolk University now through August 30th.

Kenneth C. Turino is Manager of Community Engagement and Exhibitions at Historic New England, the largest regional heritage organization in America. He is on the Council of the American Association for State and Local History and sits on AASLH's Historic House Committee. Ken is a professor in the Tufts University Museum Studies Program.

The Trustees of Reservations Announces Partners & Programs at the Boston Public Market KITCHEN

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By Mimi Hall, Trustees of Reservations' Boston Public Market Programming Manager

As the Boston Public Market's programming partner, we are excited to announce the first round of the culinary, health, and wellness partners who will offer classes, workshops, and events in the Boston Public Market KITCHEN. The Trustees of Reservations and our many collaborators will offer year-round opportunities in the 3,200 square foot, state-of-the-art demonstration kitchen including hands-on cooking demos, lectures, family activities, exercise classes, and community events within the Boston Public Market. Check out this great feature in The Boston Globe Food Section yesterday!

The KITCHEN will be a gathering place for all to share and learn about the healthy bounty of Massachusetts and New England. It will be the center of community education, programming and interaction, featuring engaging workshops, programs, tours and events that are relevant and accessible to Boston residents, commuters and visitors.

Here are just some of the exciting partners who will offer classes, workshops, and events in the KITCHEN beginning shortly after the Market opening:

  • America's Test Kitchen will offer weekly "You Can Cook" classes on the basics to help aspiring cooks become more comfortable in the kitchen.
  • The Boston Children's Museum is slated to lead a series of workshops that will promote healthy lifestyles for families with children.
  • Project Bread will offer free 'Cooking on a Budget' classes.
  • UMASS Amherst will lead lectures and demonstrations about the environmental and health impacts of the food we eat.
  • Community Servings will lead classes on healthy eating for diabetes prevention and management.
  • Let's Talk About Food and founder Louisa Kasden will get the conversation going on everything from food in schools to food technology, Public Square-style.
  • The Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (MDAR) will be holding their 31st annual Tomato Contest at the Market, featuring tomatoes from farms throughout Massachusetts.
  • Boston Ferments will be holding their third annual Boston Fermentation Festival at the market.
  • Blue Cross, Blue Shield of Massachusetts, the Market's Health & Wellness Partner, will offer weekly tastings featuring the best food of the season, as well as seasonal festivals featuring healthy and local foods.

As the largest private owner of farmland in the Commonwealth, we at The Trustees are committed to building a more sustainable food system through community supported agriculture (CSA), farm stands, pantry donation, "food by prescription" programs, day camps, cooking classes and community gardens.

We will present a selection of daily programs in the KITCHEN designed to highlight culinary experts, traditions, and local food production and inspire healthy eating, creative cooking, and wellness among families and individuals.

Connecting people to agriculture, local food, and healthy, active living has become a hallmark of the Trustees work and we are pleased to be a part of the Market's opening by providing this platform for learning and growth. We hope that by participating in these programs, Market patrons and program participants will be able to enhance their health and wellbeing and also gain an appreciation and better understanding for all of the wonderful, local agricultural, cultural and recreational resources available to them here in Boston and around the Commonwealth.

We look forward to seeing you in August!

Mimi Hall is the Program Manager for the Kitchen at the Boston Public Market, developing culinary and educational programming that will engage participants, partners and the general public - making the connection between food, the land and the people who produce it. Prior to her work with the Trustees Mimi was an advocate for the formation of a Public Market through her work with the Boston Public Market Association, organizing the launch of the Dewey Square Farmers Market at South Station and leading advocacy campaigns contributing to the state's designation of the project.

BPM Vendors Graduate from Interise Streetwise 'MBA'™ Program

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The Recipe for Small Business Success
By Jean Horstman, CEO

We at Interise are very proud of the most recent class of small business owners that graduate this evening from our StreetWise 'MBA'™ program. This class represents ten local food businesses, many of which you'll find at the soon-to-open Boston Public Market.

Interise has it's roots in Boston and has called it home for over 10 years. From the beginning we have focused exclusively on established small employers in lower income communities.

Our national headquarters is around the corner from Boston Public Market and we understand the important impact that BPM has at a regional level and we also understand the impact of Commonwealth Kitchen and their commitment to Dorchester. Given that Interise builds the capacity of our companies to grow from local to regional markets, it was a natural collaboration for Interise to sponsor this program.

We are thrilled to learn that seven of tonight's graduating companies have been accepted to become vendors at Boston Public Market and are pleased that Interise's Streetwise 'MBA'™ was an integral ingredient in their recipe for continued success. They now join a network of more than 3,000 small businesses in 60+ lower income communities across the country.

Through our Streetwise 'MBA'™, we build the capacity of established small business owners who operate primarily in lower income communities with the management knowledge, business know-how, and relationships needed to scale regionally and contribute to economic development, job creation, and social resilience.

Our most recent impact report that tracks our businesses from 2011-2013, with 857 respondents, cites an average increase in revenue of $480K; of those companies, 43% secured new contracts. Historically, Interise alumni create new jobs at 5X the rate of the private sector as a whole, based on data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

This group of graduates, with their freshly minted acumen and refined focus on strategic growth, are now ready to drive measureable results and make the most of their Boston Public Market participation. We wish our graduates continued success and we look forward to witnessing their accomplishments as they build resilience in our community and theirs.

Jean has more than 20 years of nonprofit leadership experience, spanning the private, public, and nonprofit sectors and two continents. Before joining Interise as its first CEO, Jean served as the National Director for Civic Engagement and Corporate Citizenship at Citizen Schools. She has partnered with other national social entrepreneurs, serving in senior leadership roles with Manchester Craftsmen's Guild and BELL (Building Educated Leaders for Life), and was also the Managing Director of the Society for Organizational Learning.

Boston Public Market Announces Second Round of Vendors for Permanent, Year-Round Local Food Market

BOSTON -- The Boston Public Market today announced twelve additional small businesses that will sell locally-produced goods in the new permanent, year-round market on the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway directly above the Haymarket MBTA station. Starting in July, the 28,000-square-foot Market will house over 35 farmers, fishermen, and food producers from Massachusetts and throughout New England, selling items such as farm fresh produce; meat and poultry; milk and cheese; fish and shellfish; bread and baked goods; flowers; and an assortment of specialty and prepared foods.

"We are thrilled to be included in this wonderful group of farmers, fishermen and food artisans at the Boston Public Market," said Kim Denney and Rich Jakshtis, owners of Chestnut Farms in Hardwick. "We look forward to connecting the Boston community with agriculture and offering our tasty, locally raised, healthy meat - and we also look forward to shopping there ourselves!"

UNION SQUARE DONUTS AND GEORGE HOWELL COFFEE POP-UP: TODAY In celebration of this exciting announcement, two of the new vendors, George Howell Coffee and Union Square Donuts, will host a pop-up today from 8 a.m. - 9 a.m. on Congress Street outside the Haymarket MBTA station. Free coffee and donuts will be available for passing residents and commuters (while supplies last).

"We're excited to be outside the Boston Public Market this morning, giving commuters a preview of the upcoming market," said Josh Danoff, co-founder of Union Square Donuts in Somerville. "We're looking forward to bringing our handmade, from scratch donuts to downtown Boston."

The Boston Public Market will be the only locally-sourced market of its kind in the United States. Everything sold at the Market will be produced or originate in New England. Boston Public Market vendors are proud to accept SNAP/EBT for all eligible market products.

The Market will span the ground floor of 100 Hanover Street (formerly known as 136 Blackstone Street), which also contains the Boston RMV branch, entrances to the Haymarket MBTA station, vent stacks for the Interstate-93 tunnel, and a parking garage. The Market is located in downtown Boston's emerging Market District, next to the Haymarket pushcart vendors and the historic Blackstone Block.

"At the Boston Public Market, the people of Boston can meet the faces behind their food and discover the incredible bounty of our region," said Elizabeth Morningstar, CEO of the Boston Public Market. "This is a place where all residents of Boston can come together around food and flavor, and discover a real connection to each other and the food they eat."

The Boston Public Market will feature a diverse offering of programs designed to highlight regional culinary traditions and local food production, as well as inspire healthy eating and creative cooking among families and individuals. The Trustees of Reservations is the lead programming partner and will manage and staff a teaching kitchen in the heart of the market, working with other non-profit organizations and for-profit partners to offer exciting classes, demonstrations, and other programs. More info to come!

"Being part of the Boston Public Market is a great opportunity to introduce a broader audience to the fresh herbs we grow on our farm and the tea and spice blends we produce," said Amy Hirschfeld and Tatiana Brainerd, owners of Soluna Garden Farm in Winchester. "We can't wait to meet our new Boston Public Market customers and find out what they're cooking with all of the amazing locally grown and locally produced foods from the market."

"We are thrilled to be able to support the hard work of local fishermen by bringing their catch to the Boston Public Market," said Jason Tucker, chef at Red's Best in Boston.

The second round of vendors is listed below and further information about all vendors can be found at www.bostonpublicmarket.org/vendors.

Bon Me (Boston, MA)
Bold, fresh and fun Vietnamese cuisine.

Chestnut Farms (Hardwick, MA)
Grass-fed (not corn-fed) pasture raised beef, pork, lamb, goat, and poultry as well as eggs and all natural rubs.

George Howell Coffee (Acton, MA)
Coffee and espresso drinks made with freshly roasted small batch single estate and single origin coffee, as well as a wide selection of retail beans for home brewing.

Harlow's Vermont Farmstand (Westminister, VT)
Organic produce in addition to farmstand offerings from over forty Vermont producers, including eggs, maple syrup, artisanal cheeses, jams, salsas, sauces, and a number of specialty products such as goat's milk caramels, kale chips, quince membrillo, and homemade soups.

Hopsters Alley (Newton, MA)
Growlers, bottles and cans of local beer, as well as a large selection of hand-crafted spirits and hard cider.

Lakeside Organics (Hadley, MA)
Thirty kinds of fresh, local vegetables as well as strawberries, blueberries, peaches and plums.

Mamadou's Artisan Bakery (Winchester, MA)
French-style bread and pastries.

Nella Pasta (Quincy, MA)
Fresh extruded pastas in a variety of shapes and flavors using locally sourced veggies, herbs and ancient grains along with take-and-go lunch and dinner options.

Noodle Lab (Jamaica Plain, MA)
Authentic Japanese ramen and traditional Shanghainese noodles that are hand pulled and crafted using the highest quality ingredients.

Red's Best (Boston, MA)
Fillets and shellfish for home cooking, sushi and raw bar offerings, as well as lobster rolls and other New England classic takeout lunch and dinner options.

Soluna Garden Farm (Winchester, MA)
Fresh and dried herbs; hand-blended herb, spice, and tea blends; hot and iced tea; chai latte.

Union Square Donuts (Somerville, MA)
Gourmet donuts from scratch, made by hand every day.

Greenway Farmers Market Begins Tomorrow

Greenway Farmers Market Returns With Fresh Local Food and a Taste of the Upcoming Boston Public Market

BOSTON -- The Boston Public Market's Greenway Farmers Market returns for the season today, bringing fresh local food to residents, workers, and visitors on the plaza at 136 Blackstone Street, opposite the Rose Kennedy Greenway's North End Parks. The Market offers farm fresh produce; meat, poultry, and eggs; milk and cheese; fish; bread and baked goods; flowers; and an assortment of specialty and prepared foods from more than a dozen local farmers, fishermen, and food producers.

"Despite the late spring, crops here are right on schedule, with greens coming in and strawberries starting to ripen," said Glenn Stillman, owner of Stillman's Farm in New Braintree. "We're excited to get the Greenway Farmers Market up and running and look forward to talking to customers about the upcoming Boston Public Market."

This season, the Greenway Farmers Market will run on Wednesdays from 11:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. and Sundays from 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., operating May through November.

"The Boston Public Market's Greenway Farmers Market is a wonderful opportunity to have easy access to fresh agricultural products right in the heart of the city," said Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (MDAR) Commissioner John Lebeaux. "Buy direct from the farmer, the fisherman, the artisan - Buy Local!"

To kick off the season, the Greenway Farmers Market will have live music during lunchtime (12-2 p.m.) today and cozy picnic blankets to borrow - courtesy of the Greenway - so shoppers can enjoy their local food in the Greenway's North End Parks.

"Our seasonal farmers markets bring rural farmers and urban families together to share in their love of food," said Elizabeth Morningstar, CEO of the Boston Public Market. "It's great to be back on the Greenway this season as we prepare to open the Boston Public Market in July."

2015 Greenway Vendor Line-up:

Wednesday Vendors:
Wolf Meadow Farm: traditional Italian cheese
Stillman Quality Meats: pasture-raised meats and poultry
Stillman's Farm: fresh produce and eggs
Silverbrook Farm: produce, eggs, honey and jams
Red's Best: fresh seafood
EvyTea: cold brewed tea
Freitas Farm: fruits, vegetables and plants
When Pigs Fly Bakery: fresh breads
Mad Good Cookie Company: cookies and coffee cakes
Union Square Donuts: gourmet donuts (starting in July)
Q's Nuts:sweet and savory roasted nuts
Mangé: fresh fruit vinegars
Stow Greenhouses: fresh cut flowers
Seta's Mediterranean Food: prepared Mediterranean food

Sunday Vendors:
Wolf Meadow Farm: traditional Italian cheese
Stillman Quality Meats:pasture-raised meats and poultry
Stillman's Farm:fresh produce and eggs
Silverbrook Farm: produce, eggs, honey and jams
Q's Nuts: sweet and savory roasted nuts
Stow Greenhouses: fresh cut flowers
Mangé:fresh fruit vinegars
Union Square Donuts: gourmet donuts (starting in July)
Doves and Figs: jams, chutneys and fruit mustards
Seta's Mediterranean Food: prepared Mediterranean food
When Pigs Fly Bakery:fresh breads
Mad Good Cookie Company: cookies and coffee cakes

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